Entertainment District

What is a Community Entertainment District?

A Community Entertainment District (CED) is essentially an overlay of a particular area that creates a new pool of liquor licenses that can only be issued within that area. The liquor licenses are called D5-J.

Why is this good for Mt. Washington?

Liquor licenses in Ohio are distributed based upon the population of a City, one license for every 2,000 residents. However, they are not distributed evenly. Just in the area code 45202 there are nearly 60 licenses, or 1/3 of all licenses available in Cincinnati. From there, it’s simple supply and demand. When there are less liquor licenses, the cost goes up.

Liquor licenses in a CED can not be used outside of the boundary. Additionally, they have a set cost, making it easy for a restaurant or new business to use the D5-J liquor license.

D5-J, What is that?

D5-J is a full liquor license that allows the sale of beer, wine, and spirits. The holder of a D5-J license must obtain a food service license and pass all code inspections.

How much does it cost?

The filing fee is $100. Annually, you will pay $2,344. If you would like to sell on Sunday it will be an additional $500 per year.

If you are purchasing a liquor license outside of a CED you can expect to pay nearly $30,000 just to acquire the license.

How many licenses does a CED Create?

It depends on the acreage, but anywhere between 4 and 15 new licenses.

Can a CED Boundry change after it’s implemented?

Yes! Cincinnati City Council can expand, diminish, or even repeal a CED. So far, this has not happened in Cincinnati.

Does a CED change any zoning?

No. Zoning takes preference over a CED Designation.

What rights do I have as a community member with a CED?

Good question! You have all of the same rights as you currently do with liquor licenses. Any school, church, or other organization with an objection has the right to be heard. You can follow all legal protections as a normal liquor license.

Who gets to choose which businesses can use the new licenses?

The State of Ohio processes the applications on a first come first serve basis. No local organization or city government manages this process.

Are there other CED’s in Cincinnati?

Yes! Over-the-Rhine, Clifton, North Side, College Hill, Pleasant Ridge, Corryville, The Banks, Price Hill, and Columbia Tusculum are just a few examples. Each of these neighborhoods has seen an increase in restaurants because of the CED Designation.

In Cincinnati, not a single establishment has been shut down for bad behavior.